Welcome to the Attic!

Posts tagged “fiction

Terse Tales: A Waking Nightmare

Theme: You weren’t supposed to wake up here.


From darkness to light. It all happened in an instant, the world exploding into vibrancy. I gasped— I could remember breathing, yet this felt like my first breath. The oxygen raced ragged down my throat, ripping into my lungs. It ached to breathe, it ached to see.

My brain felt unsure of how to parse the world. Light and shadow. Noises—someone was walking somewhere, something screamed, whether mechanical or animal I could not tell. There was an assault of smells that made me gag, either because they were unpleasant or because I had been so deprived. I gagged, flooding my senses with that bitter taste.

It was too much at once, and I felt myself drowning in sensation. As the flood subsided, I could piece things together, steadily understanding. Above me was the roof, wooden and in disrepair. The walls were dusty and stained. Those screams were certainly not mechanical. Those smells were certainly rot.

Worst were the shadows finding permanence. Bodies, lying on a table like the one I occupied. They lay there still, quiet, and unmoving.

And then there were the footsteps.

Something obscured my view, and my eyes struggled to refocus. Then there was a monstrous face, the source of the smell.

The eyes bulged at strange angles, barely contained by the flesh of its face. A ragged gash served as the mouth, a menagerie of teeth standing at lazy attention inside. It sniffed.

“Got another one,” it growled in a bubbling voice. It paused, head titled for a response, then shrugged. “Guess I’ll get this one.”

Rough hands on my body, like coarse stones tearing my skin. “Please,” I heard my voice, unfamiliar and harsh with disuse, “I shouldn’t be here.”

It laughed. “Of course you should. Now back to sleep.”

A needle’s pinch, then darkness.


Terse Tales: An Absence of Monsters

Theme: “The door crept open”


The growl came from the closet. There was no denying the fact nor any reconciling it with reality. Lana hadn’t been sleeping and now wouldn’t be anytime soon. Instead, she stared at the wooden door and clenched the blankets about her with the primal instinct they would protect her.

“Get it together,” she whispered through gritted teeth. The impossibility required rationality to reassert itself quickly, shoving the fear to the side. “There are no monsters in closets.”

As if to prove to herself and whatever had growled, she flung the blankets aside and put her feet on the floor. Once grounded, she expected to feel safer. Instead, she felt more certain she was going mad.

Did the knob move? The door shake? Lana strained her ears to listen for anything. Was that breathing or the AC whispering through the vents?

“This is ridiculous. You outgrew this stuff in grade school.” She stood and forced her legs toward the door.

The room was chilled, her palms clammy. She studied the narrow wooden door. It only really counted as a closet so her landlord did not run afoul of housing laws; no room for monsters in there. Lana gripped the handle and took a breath.

“Grow up, Lana,” she growled to herself in a final act of motivation.

The door crept open and–

There was Nothing.

Nothing, vast, infinite, and dark. Stretching into eternity and beyond for impossible depth. How was emptiness so much worse than everything she had imagined?

As the Void reached out to draw her in, Lana longed for fangs, fur, and claws.


Terse Tales: Star-struck

Theme: Luck


The crone had been clear with her instructions. Davalon had left the bottle under the full moon, had only water from the Halcyon Lakes since dawn, and now held the sweet-smelling elixir uncorked in his hand.

“Drink it before your task, and you will be guaranteed success. No follies will find you.” Before he left, she placed a hand on his arm, one finger raised in final warning. “Take care. This is a powerful spell. Do not squander it.”

He did not intend to. Steeling his nerves and belting his scabbard to his side, Davalon tossed his head back and drank the elixir, feeling a tingling swim through his body alongside the adrenaline. He prepared to leave for the arena, where his opponent was already boasting loudly.

The curtain to his tent swirled, and Maryalei appeared. There was a new stutter step to his heartbeat as she looked at him.

“I was not sure I would catch you,” she said.

Davalon felt his whole body vibrating with life; he was not sure if it was anticipation, fear, lovesickness, or the effects of the draught. “Marya,” he said before the words stuck. He felt like a schoolboy, not a knight-to-be. And yet, if the crone’s magic failed, when would he have this chance? “I am glad you came.”

She smiled, a hint of laughter in her eyes.

“After this,” he started, feeling a growing sense of confidence as his head swam with opportunity, “I would have your hand in marriage, if you’ll have mine?”

She rushed to him. “Of course,” she sighed, an unexpectedly easy victory.

At that moment, Davalon felt an empty feeling as the confidence fled and fear and nerves remained. One task, he recalled and hoped he might live long enough to enjoy what his potion had granted.


Terse Tales: Anticipation

Theme: They never saw it coming


Trevor bounced from foot to foot, waiting for the doors to open and admit his soon-to-be wife down the aisle. He felt sweat run down his collar, a heavy smile on his nervous lips. He had not seen her since yesterday’s rehearsal, per tradition and her request; he imagined her resplendent for him alone. So he looked to the heavy wooden doors at the end of the aisle as the organ geared up and started the notes.

It was a bar too far into the song and the doors had not opened. He shifted again, smile shuddering, still waiting. Then, a creak and groan as the aged wood slowly edged open.

His eyes found hers just above her harsh smile. And then confusion and panic settled in as another figure in a white dress started down the aisle as well, hand in hand. Her father was supposed to be walking her down the aisle, but instead, there was a second bride.

The nerves settled firmly into a knot in his stomach.

Anna walked down the aisle in time to the song, never letting her gaze deviate from his. His eyes swung back and forth between his bride and the other woman, trying to wake up from this nightmare. Finally, the song ended and Anna stood at the bottom of the steps. They had rehearsed; he would go down, take her hand, and help her up. Only he froze.

“I figured since you thought you could date both of us, you wouldn’t mind marrying us both?” she said with acid dripping from her voice.

Louisa smiled too, and he was trapped beneath their withering gazes. “Only I’m not sure either of us wants to say ‘I do.’”

Trevor fainted, the only way to save any dignity he had left.


Terse Tales: The Dating Game

Theme: “Laughter filled the air.”


Dave sat on the edge of the bed and shifted again, loosening the tie around his neck and grinning at the woman across from him. Susan? Sarah? One of those typical names. However, she was far from typical, he began to realize.

“So, I don’t normally do this. I know, big shock.” His nervous laughter filled the air, bouncing off the freshly pressed sheets and dusty curtains.

She just smiled, that same absent smile that had been plastered on her face since he opened the door. She tilted her head, and Dave got the sudden image of a gyroscope, her head rotating around the stable point of that lipsticked smile.

The woman at the bar had led the conversation, steadily building Dave’s confidence to Icarian levels. When he slyly passed his room key to her, he felt certain of the move. And then instantly expected her to laugh him away. Instead, she raised an eyebrow and tucked the key into the distractingly low neckline of her dress.

And now, that smile.

“Can I get you something to drink?” he asked nervously. “I got ice from the machine earlier, and—“

Her finger was on his lips, gently silencing him. She smiled wider and leaned over the edge of the bed. Maybe, Dave thought, this was normal and he was the weird one. Frankly, that had held true in most of his life.

“You’re the boss,” he said with another burst of nervous laughter.

“Oh, I’m much more than that,” she said. And the smile grew wider, showing more teeth than fit in a human jaw. Had they always been that sharp?

With practiced ease, she flew to his throat, successfully cutting off the scream before it could bubble out. The hunt looked different nowadays, but the outcome never changed.


Terse Tales: Daughter of Earth

Theme: Image Prompt


My feet could no longer feel the earth beneath them, but I remembered it.

I remembered the feel of dark soil under my soles, thrumming with the vibrancy of earth and whispering ancient ways to me. The sway of Mother Earth, the loving gaze of Mother Moon. The exaltation of all things feminine and trampled by the day-to-day life.

We danced, my sisters and I, beneath that moonlight. We leaped, held aloft in the arms of our two mothers, cradled in that space. In the smoke and stars, we saw visions.

I remembered breathing deep the perfume of wilted flowers and sweat, mingled with the bonfire scent. It was intoxicating and every time my feet dug into the soil, I could feel the bounty of life surge through me. We joined together to celebrate the divine around us, the divine within us.

Moonlight, starlight, dirt, and blood. In those moments, we existed not as human flesh, but as something carved from the essential elements and told to celebrate. I did not need air to live, only those moments of ecstasy. My worship kept my heart beating, my lungs moving, and I thrived on that inhuman diet on those nights of revelry.

The flickering shadows of the fire threw scenes of the future before us, cloudy, mystical. And somehow we did not see what was to come until the sacredness of our space was trampled beneath booted feet, feet that could not feel the hum of the earth. Their bodies were covered so that even the moonlight could not strike them.

My feet no longer feel the earth beneath them, dangling here in the in-between. All I feel is the grip of the rope, punishment for daring to touch the sacred.  


Terse Tales: The Knock

Theme: Escape


Jessie settled in her chair and let the beach surround her. Deep breath in and she tasted the salty air, slightly fishy, but pleasantly so. She heard gulls circling out at sea, their calls coming in with the steady rhythm of the waves. Her phone buzzed; she ignored it.

The sun was warm, bright. The sand beneath her feet radiated heat up through the soles of her feet, and she dug her toes down to find cooler sand below. The phone was ringing. Another deep breath, sinking into her seat.

She watched the waves come in and out, sea dancing with sunlight, white foam licking at the sand. Another ring, this time an email, and she let the waves carry away the distraction. Her ears settled on the roar of the waves.

Someone was knocking on a door, and she let her eyes drift across the sand. Now there was the sound of kids playing, calling to one another. A steady bubble of human chatter beneath the steady pulse of the waves. She breathed in time to the tides, in and out, with the same steadiness and certainty.

Just a peaceful day on the beach, blue skies, white sands, and–another knock. “Jessie? You in there? I brought the reports you asked for. I can come back later?” No footsteps. Lena was, despite her words to the contrary, waiting.

Jessie’s eyes snapped open, the beach fading from her mind as the office returned. Her peace lay shattered and dispersed in the piles of paper on her desk. She briefly noticed that her hands were digging into the arm of her chair. So much for a break.

She stood and opened the door before Lena could leave. Deep breath in, the subtle scent of salt, as the world reclaimed its space.


Terse Tales: When Opportunity Calls

Theme: The call came at midnight


The phone was ringing. I reached a hand toward the buzzing, glowing thing and sat up, trying to clear the sleep from my voice. 

“Hello?” It didn’t work, and my words came out with the familiar fuzzy, just-woken quality. 

“Mike? It’s Chris.” Chris. I checked the caller ID on the screen. New guy from work. Nice enough, but not the sort I would take middle of night phone calls from. 

“Uh-huh,” I added to the conversation, dropping all pretense. If you called this late–early–then you knew the person had been sleeping. 

“I figured it out. I was having this dream, and it just all–Boom!” 

“Figured what out?” 

“The time travel project, of course” 

“Time travel?” 

Chris laughed. “Why else do you think I’d be waking you up? We both know what a grump you are.” 

He was clearly drunk. Or high. Probably both, I reasoned. 

“Listen, Chris, I think you need to get back to sleep. We’ve got work tomorrow, and we can talk then.” I figured he would instead be sleeping off whatever this was, but did not say as much. I just wanted to go back to sleep myself. 

“Work? Mike, what are you–” he stopped midsentence. 

“It’s Wednesday morning, bud. Sleep it off.” 

“No, it’s not. We don’t–” 

He paused, there was an intake of breath on the line. Part excitement, part shock. 

“What’s the date, Mike?” 

“Now? It’s February 10.” I said after checking the phone screen. 

“February 10…” he trailed off, waiting for me. 

I sighed and ran a hand across my face. The smart thing to do was hang up. “2021,” I said instead. 

“Oh.” In his voice was surprise, confusion. “Oh,” he said again. This time somber and shocked. “I have to get back,” were his final words before the call disconnected. 


Terse Tales: Homesick

This is a new thing. Welcome to my first Terse Tale, chosen as a name almost entirely because of alliteration. I’ll be sharing some micro stories I have been writing for an online challenge over the past few weeks. These are 100-300 word stories based on a given prompt. I’ve always been rather wordy, so I have found it really tough and rewarding to try and tell a convincing story in a short format. Sometimes the attempts is a success, other times less so. But I have found myself thinking a lot more about what I say and how I say it when writing. Ideally, I will post these weekly for as long as I continue to write them!

So, in the interest of brevity, here is the first one, based on the theme “it was as if time itself stopped.”


It was as if time itself stopped. Or perhaps that was just wishful thinking. I wondered how long I could stay there silent, motionless, barely breathing. Perhaps they would just go away and I could imagine nothing was wrong.

They were touching me now, a hand light on my arm. I think it was supposed to be reassuring, yet it only served to threaten my careful shell of denial. And they were talking, but I could not be bothered to tune my mind to their words. I was in freefall and neither gravity nor time could touch me unless I chose to stop.

“We’re not going home?” My words broke through, surprising both of us, and they stumbled mid-sentence. A heartbeat of silence.

“No. The boosters were too damaged to get us off the surface.” They were repeating what they had already said, I realized, but the words felt all new to me, striking a fatal blow each time.

“Rescue?”

“Not with the storms and solar flares picking up. We’re lucky to have landed at all.”

Lucky, they said. Didn’t feel that way. I glanced at the small photo taped haphazardly to my work station. That small face that I knew would age years in the time I was away, but now–

“Food?”

“A few weeks, with rationing. No one could have predicted–” 

“And a few months until rescue,” I interrupted. They didn’t say anything more. They did not need to. I understood perfectly my sentence as I was to serve it. Weeks or months had no meaning; I would float through the remaining time left, but I was already dead. 

I grabbed the picture as I walked away. He and I were now both frozen moments in time, even if mine soon would run out.


A Listener Reviews: How to Bury the Pets

I was contacted by the creator of How to Bury the Pets and asked to write a review of the episode. I listened to it a couple of weeks ago and, after opting to take a week off in respect to the ongoing protests in our country, wanted to share my thoughts.

How to Bury the Pets

Episodes: 1. This is a fully contained story in one episode, with plans to produce similar stories in the future.

Length:  50 minutes

I’ve listened to… All of it

The Premise: The story  follows the intersecting lives of Dan and Miles at the front counter of a pet store. Dan, a self-absorbed middle-aged white man in suburbia, is trying desperately to avoid dealing with his impending divorce. Miles is the black clerk at the store navigating his own family and social stressors. The story deals with themes of race, opportunity, and how we respond to challenges in life.

My Review: I am a sucker for short, self-contained fiction. I have spent a large part of my life writing short stories, and so I can appreciate the unique requirements of short fiction. How to Bury the Pets  works within those bounds well and tells a very interesting story. It is a realistic fiction podcast, with some humorous moments throughout. However, it also deals with some major themes that are worth extra thought even after the story ends. It begins in the midst of suburbia, wanders through rodent genocide, and winds up with some poignant thoughts about race.

The thing I most enjoyed about this story overall was how well contrasted the two characters are throughout. They share some commonalities, but their responses to the situations they face are opposed. They work as excellent foils to one another, and I think there are some beautifully crafted parallels that serve to set in stark contrast their responses to the situations they face. The characters are both very well-developed with their own internal motivations that are woven throughout the narrative. I was impressed by how often their unique characteristics are demonstrated throughout the story in big and small ways, showcasing a consistency of character development that is impressive. I’d love to say more about this, but I don’t want to give anything away.

These contrasts in the characters also serve to propel the underlying message regarding racism. The story directly addresses some covert and overt forms of racism that exist, while also portraying the inequalities that are present for many people on a daily basis. The way assumptions are presented and undermined throughout helps to shine a light on how damaging everyday discrimination can be.  It confronts white discomfort and demonstrates how many people have no idea what different challenges may be faced by people of color.

In addition, the voice acting is incredibly well done. There is brief narration throughout, typically in a rather flat tone, that serves to set the scene and provide important context. Dan and Miles really come alive in the story through their voice actors. There are very emotional moments that are delivered with perfection. I feel like I had a very clear mental picture of these moments throughout, and they were vivid in their depiction. The voice acting provided a life to the story that brings it beyond the realm of fiction and into the real world we all share.

Overall, this was a very enjoyable, thought provoking listen. There were moments of humor, there were times I cringed, and there were plenty of moments that highlighted the role of race in everyday interactions. It is well written, well acted, and a great example of short fiction that carries an important message.

You can find them here:  The Podplay


Twinkle Twinkle

Gabe walked out hand in hand with the girl from the party. Her name was Jessica, he thought. It had been loud inside, and he was always terrible with names. He did know that she was pretty, laughed at his jokes, and kept smiling at him all night. Those, for the moment, were certainly more important than names.

“You know how they do those stupid human trick shows and stuff?” he asked her. It was cold out, and he remembered seeing the words coalesce in the early morning darkness.

She pulled her arms around her and nodded. “Yeah, like burping the alphabet backwards or fitting into a shoebox or something?”

“Yeah, that kind of stuff.” He paused and gave her a smile he hoped came across as intriguing and not creepy as it felt. “I’ve got one of my own.”

He could almost see the eye roll. And to be fair, it did sound like a bad pick-up line, now that he played it back. But that wasn’t the point. The bad pick-up line would come later.  “Not like that,” he added quickly, the false bravado and charm fading away.

She took a step or two away, looking at him with a subtle smile. Then she raised an eyebrow. “Show me.”

He smiled. “Okay, look up at the sky and pick a star,” he explained, hurrying over to stand just behind and to the side of her.

“Alright, that one,” she said with finality.

“Can you point to it? So I know which one?”

“Well, this isn’t going to be much of a magic trick if I show you my star, but sure.” She lifted her arm and pointed to a middling bright star in the middle of the sky.

“Good choice,” he said thoughtfully, then raised his arm. “Keep your eye on that star, and—“ he extended his finger, pointing to the star as well. “Poof.”

Like that, the star blinked out, leaving a little patch of black in the sky.

“Whoa, did you just—can you do it again?”

He laughed, then answered her. “Yeah, of course. Choose another one.”

She did, and they repeated the process. Four times total.

“That’s amazing. I mean, you just point and they disappear?”

“Yeah,” he said, with insincere humility, “just something that I’ve been able to do since I was a kid. Don’t show off too much or else the government might track me down.” She leaned back against him, staring up at the sky with its covering of stars that now seemed not quite so far away. “And if you think that’s impressive, “ he said, leaning close to her ear, “you should see what else these fingers can do.”

And there was the bad pick-up line.

___

It was later, lying in bed, that Jessica—that was her name, he had confirmed surreptitiously—brought the trick up again.

“So, like, do the stars just stay out or…?”

He blinked his eyes open and shifted his position, trying to stay focused despite a wave of grogginess. “No, they come back, at least by the next night or so. I’ve never really timed it.”

“And you can just do that? Like, you weren’t hit on the head with a meteor or born in a spaceship or anything?”

“Not that I know of. Just found out when I went star watching with my grandpa one year.”

“And you primarily use this power to get women to sleep with you?”

“What?” he asked, a hint of offense coloring his words. “I definitely do not do that. It’s just that the only people I trust with my secret ability are those that are willing to sleep with me. I can’t just let everyone know I’m the world’s most useless superhero. If my secret identity got out,” he chuckled and let the sentence hang incomplete, settling comfortably into the pillows.

“Well, your secret is safe with me,” she said, rolling over and pulling the covers around her contentedly.

Gabe closed his eyes, breathing a deep sigh as he let the drowsiness take over. He was nearly asleep again when her voice broke through.

“But what if there are, like, planets round those stars?”

He shook his head, as if that would shake off the sleepy feeling. “Planets?” he asked, trying to quickly replay the last few seconds to make sure he knew what she said. “I’m sure there are planets around them. Aren’t there tons of planets out there?”

“Yeah, yeah, but” she sat up, suddenly looking excited, “but what if there are people on the planets? And you just turned out their sun?”

“Oh no,” he said, throwing his arm over his face and rolling to the side with theatrics. “I picked up the crazy chick. Don’t tell me you believe in aliens.”

She gave him a playful push on the shoulder, laughing herself. This was one of those moments he would go back to after their relationship eventually dissolved. Her in the bed, hair tousled, eyes sleepy, but a wide smile on her face as she laughed. Through the laughter, she thought out her response. “I mean, no, not really, but who knows, right? There’s so much out there, and—“

“Listen, if there are aliens out there, they can come and ask for an apology. I’ll give it to them. But I think it is mighty suspicious that sightings of aliens have dropped now that everyone has a handy camera with them 24/7. So I think I’m safe.”

And yet, here he was.

___

The abduction didn’t happen like it did in the movies. There was no blinding white light or tractor beam. And Gabe was pretty sure he was not paralyzed, at least not physically. It was, however, very much like those kidnapping movies that took off for a while. A bunch of shadows in his bedroom that suddenly lunged and grabbed him on all sides, sliding something bag-like over his head, and then carrying him out of the house. Gabe heard the door squeak shut behind them, the sound of too many feet on the gravel, and then an electronic whoosh and snap sound. The air around him was cooler, not the humid summer heat, and the light making its way through whatever was on his head was brighter. He felt cold ground beneath him as they set him down, then everything stopped.

His heart was still pounding in his chest, a rapid beat that threatened to burst right out of his chest. He tried taking everything in, tried making the shadows he had seen match anything plausible. He was being kidnapped, that was certain, but he had a very unsettling feeling it was not by anyone or anything he had encountered before.

“You can remove the hood,” said a voice. The sound of English made his heart slow a pace or two. They spoke English. So that meant it was unlikely anything as absurd as his mind had raced to.

“I can leave it on, if you prefer. You know, so I don’t know who you are. So you don’t have to kill me.” The words poured out of his mouth, sounding stupider than he thought.

A sigh. “I’d prefer to speak to you directly.”

Gabe grabbed the hood and lifted it off in a fumbling motion. And as his eyes adjusted to the bright light, the conversation so long ago with Jessica came rushing back.

In the movies, abductions use tractor beams. In the movies, aliens are vaguely humanoid. Gabe was discovering both of these were simply Hollywood magic and nothing at all related to reality.

The gathering of being stood around his cage. There were five of them—no six. One had no form at all, but did appear to be a collection of moving haze. One at least had clear legs, though there were four of them. He could generally find eyes in their various places on the beings, and some had indentions that Gabe thought could possibly be mouths. But beyond that, his understanding of their anatomy stopped. Despite the bright lights, the room started to go dark around the edges. Then the middle. Then everywhere.

___

The room was still cold and bright when Gabe awoke, and there was a hum of activity off to the side. He was not in his bedroom, which meant something had happened, but it most certainly could not be those things swimming to the surface of his mind.

Voices. He tried to focus on them, if only to stop the spinning in his head.

-not what we really were expecting.”

“Does it really matter what this creature is like? It’s dangerous!”

“I just don’t think we should make any sort of rash decision.”

“No one is suggesting we act rashly but just—“

“Me. I suggest we act rashly. Who knows? It could wipe us all out before we even—“

“Now we have no reason to think—“

“You don’t get to just—“

The voices began to meld into a stream of babble and yelling that was indistinguishable. Gabe slowly rolled over, letting himself finally take a look at his surroundings.

It was, unfortunately, exactly as he remembered. A white room, bars surrounding him, and a menagerie of completely alien creatures standing in a huddled mass to the side.

Eventually one of them—some creature with what looked like tentacles and apparently a mouth that opened by splitting their head widely down the middle—noticed he was moving.

“It has awoken,” it said, a sharp tone of panic in its voice. The others turned quickly to stare at him.

“Earthling,” said one of them, taking a step towards him. This one had four legs, three long protrusions with what looked like eyeballs, and no discernible mouth. Nothing moved when he spoke, but Gabe heard it clearly. “We have been sent to neutralize you.”

“You speak English,” Gabe gawked, his mind trying desperately to help him see that was not the important part here. The alien’s face fell, as did the others, and Gabe was amazed to discover he could recognize disdain in completely alien features. Perhaps that was another superpower he possessed.

“Our ship automatically translates all language into something you can understand.”

Curiously, Gabe also discovered that the same disappointed tone was also easily interpreted. He sat staring and they stared back at him. Now that he had a chance to see them without passing out, he realized they were all wearing what looked like armor of some sort. The pieces were all different, fit to their physiology, but made of some thick, dark, shiny substance. They were some sort of military squadron? Or pirates? Or space cops?

His mind finally ran through and processed what had been said to him before, and panic shot through his system. “Wait, neutralize?”

“He got there!” said one of the creatures, though Gabe did not look quickly enough to tell who. From the gestures being made, he thought it might have been amorphous creature standing towards the back and cycling through different colors, but he could not be sure.

The four-legged alien spoke again. “Yes, that is our mission. We have been sent to save our homes and neutralize you. By whatever means necessary.”

“I think you have the wrong person. I just work in a call center. I don’t have anything to do with aliens.”

“So you aren’t the one who keeps extinguishing our stars?”

Had he been on Earth, Gabe was certain this would be a good time to request a lawyer. But, with aliens, he was not sure if the idea of a lawyer even translated. Or was an option. They had just kidnapped him, after all. Or was it an arrest? He felt out of his depth.

“Can I plead the fifth? Is that a thing?”

The gathered group turned toward one another, then back to him. “That is not an answer. Have you extinguished our stars?”

One of the group stepped forward slightly. Its face, or what Gabe liked to think of as its face, was covered in a smattering of shiny, black spheres. Most likely eyes, but this was all a learning exercise for him. The sides of its head suddenly lifted, two large wing-like appendages stretching into the air. These were connected to the rest of it by shimmering strands of something. It stood there, waiting.

“What would happen if I had?”

“This is going to take all day, Devlox.” Now Gabe was sure it was the large amorphous creature. It turned a striking shade of maroon with impatience.

“We have plenty of time before we reach home system. If it takes many days, it takes many days.”

“Home system?” said Gabe, sitting up straighter and feeling his heart begin to race again. “You mean we’re leaving Earth?”

“Yes, we left some time ago. As soon as we boarded, actually,” responded Devlox. Gabe felt a little better. This…being was at least willing to be reasonable. To answer questions. The good cop, thought Gabe. And bad cop was back there. But that still left a lot of undecided creatures in the wings.

“But then what if it’s not me?”

The collection of haze spoke. Its voice was in the ship, but Gabe also seemed to feel it resonating through him. All in all, it was a very unpleasant situation. “Earthling, we already know it is you. Devlox and his kind are more…skeptical of modern technology.”

“I’m simply not willing to base such a decision on the advice of a machine, Cylantha. There is nothing wrong with being diligent.”

Cylantha sighed, which felt similar to a strong wind pushing against Gabe’s body. “Yes, but this whole interrogation is simply to satisfy you.”

“Fine,” Devlox stomped back, a feat Gabe noted was more impressive with more legs. “Then what do you suggest we do? Go ahead and execute it?”

The amorphous creature turned a shade of green that Gabe felt very unsettled by. “That’s the easiest way, yes.”

Another, tinier voice spoke up as a rather short, squid-like creature piped up. “It is wrong to kill another creature. We must find another way”

“Wrong to kill a creature that could wipe out all our planets in an instant? That’s wrong?” spoke the tentacle creature that had first alerted them to Gabe’s consciousness.

“It always brought them back,” added the little one, not shrinking down from the intimidating figure. “Right?” he asked, turning toward Gabe.

“Well, I mean, I guess so. I didn’t really do anything, you see.”

“So you mean to say you didn’t extinguish the stars?” asked Devlox.

“I guess, I mean, I did. I didn’t mean to. Well, I meant to, but I didn’t mean to hurt anyone.”

“And you brought them back?” added Devlox.

“They just, always came back. I didn’t have to do anything.”

The creature with the wing-like appendages and many eyes stepped back, the wings folding back in. “It is telling the truth,” it said in a monotone. Somehow, that did not seem to help.

The large creature now stepped forward. “You mean to tell me you just hoped they would come back?” it roared, skin flashing all shades of dark blue and purple.

“You just hoped it would work?” squeaked the tiny creature with a hurt, accusing tone. Gabe shrank back more from the disappointment than the rage. He had always been susceptible to a good guilt trip.

There was a push of wind, something from Cylantha, Gabe assumed, and the group quieted. It was silent, and in that silence Gabe felt guilt pouring over him. The only solution was to break that silence. “So you are telling me I’ve been turning your sun off and on for all these years?”

“Yes,” came the exasperated sigh from most of the seven assembled beings. It was not in unison, but almost.

“And you had no idea what you were doing?” asked Devlox. Gabe noticed that the wing flaps were back up.

“I knew if I pointed at a star, it would blink out. And then come back later. I had no idea there were aliens—“ he watched the whole room recoil at that word—“up there. I never wanted to hurt anyone.”

“It is telling the truth,” came the same monotone report as the wings closed again.

“So you just kept doing it? With no thought to the consequences?” asked Cylantha.

“I didn’t know anyone else was out there.”

“So this is the great Destroyer,” said Devlox, pacing across the ship. Again, it was remarkable to Gabe how universal disappointment seemed to be. “Sorry there will be no need for an honor duel, Antu,” it finished, waving to the amorphous creature who had settled into a silvery green shade.

“It would not be much of a fight,” snapped back Antu.

“Do we have to kill him, then?” squeaked the squid-like creature. Devlox looked to the group.

“I don’t know,” said the weary creature after a moment. “Things are not going according to the plan.”

“How did you get your powers?” asked Cylantha, wafting forward toward the bars. “Did you purchase them? Performa a ritual? Defeat a great enemy?”

Gabe shrugged, then realized that might not translate to a group of beings with no shoulders to speak of. “I don’t know. I just always could.”

“And you never found that odd?” asked the hazy form again.

“I mean, sure, it was a weird trick. I’d show people sometimes and they’d be amazed. But I tried not to make a big deal out of it. Sounds like it caused you all a lot of problems.”

“Well, mass panic intermittently, irregularities in temperature and gravitational fields, and the crushing despair that one day Kav’nu may not return,” bristled a blue-shaded Antu.

“I’m sorry,” said Gabe.

“See, it’s sorry everyone. We can just forgive it and go on with our lives,” squeaked the squid.

All three of Devlox’s eye stalks peered down at the tiny thing, blinking slowly. “That’s not how this works, Meerk. It could still destroy us all.”

“But it said it’s sorry.”

“And I am sorry. I promise, now that I know, I won’t do it again.” Gabe began to foolishly hope that this tactic might actually work, given his sincerity.

“Oh, we will be sure of that,” said Devlox, eyes returning forward.

“You’re going to kill me?” Gabe whispered.

“Not yet. But we are going to keep an eye on you. You say it happens when you point? Wait, Viremat,” Devlox gestured to the thing with many eyes that stepped forward, raising the flaps on its head again.  “It only happens when you point at a star?”

Gabe nodded.

“Speak,” ordered Cylantha.

“Yes,” squeaked Gabe, feeling so many eyes on him.

“It speaks the truth.”

Devlox took a deep breath. “Alright then, Antu, get something to hold its arms down. We’ve got a long trip ahead of us.”


Thanks for reading!

I haven’t written in a long time. I’ve dabbled here and there, but this was one of the first times I sat down with an idea and just got to get it out there. I typed it up on my day off, gave it a read through and made some adjustments, but I’m just so happy that I got something done! This is an idea that I had in the first few weeks after my little girl was born. Those were some rough weeks and, despite being tired, my anxiety was doing a great job ensuring I was not sleeping. “Sleep when the baby sleeps.” Haha, okay then.

I started developing this idea then, after singing Twinkle Twinkle Little Star to her. And having something to think about, a world to play with, it made me start to feel better. So I really wanted to get back to this and flesh out this character. It’s changed a lot from where it started, but I think it was a fun idea to play with. It’s what I needed then, and what I needed now to help me do something just for me.