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Posts tagged “comedy

A Listener Reviews: Life with LEO(h)

Life with LEO(h)

Episodes: 3 so far

Length: 25-40 minutes each

I’ve listened to… all available episodes

Transcripts Available: Yes, linked here

The Premise: Life With LEO(h) follows Jeanine, a futuristic lawyer specializing in keeping one rule-bending company out of trouble. After saving them yet again, she is given her very own android. The problem is, LEO(h) has free will, something that is definitely not okay. The story follows Jeanine, caught in this ethical nightmare, and LEO(h), the loving, empathic, optimistic, and only sort of helpful android as they confront questions about free will and love.

My Review: I was contacted to review this audidorama and was so excited. As I mentioned when reviewing them, The Bright Sessions was one of the first audiodramas that got me truly hooked on the genre. So when Atypical Artists reached out about one of their new projects, it was an easy choice.

The story so far has been a blast. Jeanine and LEO(h) are incredibly interesting characters, and the supporting cast really add a great background to provide depth to the world and additional stakes. The writing is sharp and engaging. There is a wonderful pace to every scene that keeps the story moving along, while unraveling strange cases or sifting through personal problems. Each episode is constructed to move the overall story forward, while also handling new challenges.

In one sense, it feels like a really smartly written sitcom. The episodes each have their own individual struggles, and each of these play into the bigger picture. The comedic aspects of it are very much based on the absurdity of certain situations and vicarious awkwardness, and yet that balances very well with the real important questions. Early on, the story introduces the concept of consent. LEO(h) has free will, except in that he must love Jeanine. The show dives straight into the question of whether or not that is free will, and can consent be freely given?

The world feels close to ours, albeit with advanced AI and androids. The situations are realistic extensions of what we experience today, updated to a futuristic setting. As the show has progressed, the intricacies of this reality have been further and further developed. Jeanine’s work colleagues offer insights into the complex system set up to try and manage the world of android law. Through their cases and conversations, the preconceived ideas and assumptions that keep things running begin to show up, and LEO(h) serves as a contrast to the legal precedent.

In addition, Jeanine’s sister and fiancée break up the tension with their good-spirited banter and familial taunting. They offer a space for Jeanine to reflect and get a good reality check as needed, while also rooting for some exciting romantic drama to keep them entertained. They are a wonderful addition and serve to provide a human, lighthearted element to the story overall.

I am truly smitten with Life with LEO(h) so far. The writing is quick, witty, and engaging. The plot is well-paced and intriguing. The characters, both main and secondary, are relatable, energetic, and realistic. I also cannot wait to see where they take some of the big questions around free will, sentience, love, and consent. I am not a huge romance fan, but this is one romcom I am eagerly waiting for, episode after episode. If you like some laughter and humanity in your sci-fi audiodrama, it is definitely one to listen to.

You can find them here: Life with LEO(h) and support the podcast here


A Listener Reviews: BRASS

BRASS

Photo image features Ron Richardson as Lord Brass, Kate Kraay as Lady Brass, Jeremy Adams as Cyril Brass and Katherine Grant-Suttie as Gwendolyn Brass. Photo by Wynne Earle.

Episodes: 34, with more coming to complete the fourth and final season

Length: Generally around 15 minutes, with some select episodes running in the 25-35 minutes range

I’ve listened to… 11 episodes. I intended to listen to six, then figured I would finish up the first season, and then accidentally listened to one more. A complete accident, of course.

The Premise: BRASS is a steampunk adventure following the titular family of scientific geniuses as they unravel the criminal underworld of an alternate universe 19th century. It is a light-hearted adventure story with moments of danger, humor, science fiction, and just plain old good storytelling.

My Review: This review started with a request from the creators, and so I wanted to give them a listen. I usually start listening to the first three episodes of a podcast. I give them a chance to overcome maybe a challenging opening and catch me within three episodes. I was hooked by episode one and eager to listen to more. Which is how I may have ended up binging far more episodes than I intended originally for the writing of this review. And I will certainly be finishing the story now that I’ve begun.

BRASS is full of fun. It is a full cast audiodrama, and the voice acting really serves to provide additional depth to the characters. There is so much of the story that is told through tone, with a heavy hand of sarcasm throughout, and I am certain you will hear the eyerolls in their voices at times. The characters each have their set roles and personalities, but they play very well off of one another. The writing is sharp as well, providing good interplay between characters. I also find the narration to strike a nice balance. It provides enough context to understand, without slowing the story down or missing out on character building moments. It mirrors the old radio announcer style in a way that is instructive and likable.

This podcast does one thing that I think tends to make me happy in any media. It has fun. The story does not take itself too seriously, but plays with the rules and creates interesting situations which allow the characters to shine throughout. Sometimes things are a little too convenient or bend the limits of the believable. But if you accept the offer to suspend disbelief, I think it is truly an enjoyable experience to follow along with the family Brass.

The world is familiar, yet distinct enough to leave space for discovery and exploration, and I find they weave in the steampunk elements enough to give some extra creativity when it comes to not only problem solving, but also the dangerous stakes facing the family. I personally have really loved the allusions to and cameos from various historical and literary figures, and I find those moments feel like a familiar inside joke. Plus, if you do fall in love with the world of BRASS, there are many different opportunities to learn more. Not only is there the podcast, but also another podcast of short stories from the world, live theater productions, and a short film. It speaks to the depth of the worldbuilding that they have been able to create and support so many windows into the goings on.

BRASS is ultimately a fun escape into a world adjacent to our own. The characters are entertaining and endearing in their own ways. The writing is done well, moving the story along at a good pace while focusing on the relationships between characters. Most of all, this is a story that enjoys taking you along for the journey, and wants to make sure you are enjoying it as well. It has kept me wondering about what will happen next and how characters will escape the dangers ahead. It is funny, engaging, intriguing, and witty. I am definitely sad that I had not listened to them before, but very happy to have the chance to catch up now.

You can find them here: BRASS. And support them here.


A Listener Reviews: Mission Rejected

Mission Rejected

Episodes: 22 so far

Length: 30-45 minutes, usually

I’ve listened to… everything released so far

The Premise: Mission Rejected tells the story of the agents who take the rejected missions. It centers on Agent Skip Granger, who is tasked to save the world in increasingly mundane locations when the agency’s star asset hits reject.

My Review: I had not given much thought to that old cliché phrase, “Your mission, should you choose to accept it…” until this podcast came along. But they took a simple concept and developed it in an extraordinary way.

Each episode focuses on a specific mission, with the buildup, planning, implementation, unraveling, and conclusion. If you like action movies and spy flicks, I am certain you will recognize many of the themes and tropes. There are kooky gadgets, mad scientists, evil geniuses, hidden lairs, and a cast of misfit characters tackling it all. I am really torn in writing this review. I wanted to say that the misfit characters are really what make this story. But then I started thinking it was the sharp, witty writing. And then I thought about the subtle jokes and gags that make me laugh in-universe and at our own world. And the sound design is done wonderfully well. Plus they have an episode with multiple original songs that honestly I would listen to outside of the podcast. So, I’m having a bit of trouble, because they do so much well.

Let’s take things one at a time. The characters are a well-developed bunch that demonstrate character growth over the course of the episodes, while also holding true to their roles within the team. After a few episodes, you get a good feel for how they fit together (or how they grate against each other), which provides a lot of contrasting motivations, even when the goal should be on the mission. No one is static in this show, and each character has their own needs, wants, dreams, and growth areas that are changing as the seasons progress. It is truly enjoyable just listening to those interactions.

And the writing is top notch. Dialogue is sharp, character consistent, and honestly makes me laugh out loud in my car. The overarching plot is paced well, with increasing danger and intrigue as the master plot develops, but enough standalone spy-work in each episode to keep you locked in. Plus, the storylines throw some unexpected twists into the plot as they plays with the expected thriller tropes. It does not rely on narration, but tells the story through dialogue. I think they do a great job of outlining the scene and providing visual information through really natural conversations, updates, and observations of the characters. Plus, as I mentioned, they use sound design to create deeper backgrounds, letting a listener fill in the gaps. There are good sound cues that help provide disruptions, plot progression, or general background to bring the events to life.

The world of Mission Rejected looks much like our own, with enough differences to provide the escape I need from reality. It does help it provide some laughs when things hit closer to home than expected, however. As a mom to a toddler, I’m not sure I needed Baby Whale taking up any brain real estate, but there it is. Speaking of the Baby Whale song, I have to say there is a musical episode, and I cannot even conceptualize the amount of work and creativity that went into creating such fantastic, on point songs for each scene. The story is told through the songs in a competition, and it not only progresses character story arcs, but does so with snappy tunes. I was floored.

Because there should probably be a limit to how much I gush about one individual show, I will wrap up. Suffice it to say Mission Rejected has been a highlight of my audiodrama queue recently. It provides the perfect escape and pick-me-up I need during 2020 with a cast of endearing characters that I root for week after week. It has strong writing, strong characters, a lot of laughter, and a fun idea executed to perfection. I strongly recommend you accept.

You can find them here: Mission Rejected