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A Listener Reviews: Janus Descending

Janus Descending

Episodes: 13 full episodes with three prologues, and epilogue, and a full supercut available.

Length: 15-30 minutes per episode, with the supercut totaling 222 minutes

I’ve listened to… Everything

Transcripts Available: Yes, linked here

The Premise: Two scientists discover evidence of an abandoned world and set off on a journey to uncover what happened to the missing civilization. The story is told in alternating segments from the perspectives of the scientists, one starting from the beginning and the other from the end of the story.

My Review: As I mentioned last week when discussing Primordial Deep, it is wholly my oversight not to talk about Janus Descending earlier. For sci-fi horror, you really cannot go wrong listening to this story, and they have a sequel story in the works now. When I saw something new show up in the Janus Descending feed, I immediately loaded it up to listen and was so excited. So let me tell you why you should listen.

Chel and Peter are the main characters, and episodes alternate between their personal logs. These logs are made up of descriptive information about the planet and their discoveries alongside personal reflections and monologues. They both know the other may be listening, and so they also serve as notes between the two, messages separated in time. Chel and Peter have very different approaches to the discovery, with Peter often taking a more cautious approach, while Chel is chasing the excitement of exploration. Between their two perspectives, the listener gets a clearer sense of the reality of their situation. It is one filled with wonder and riddled with danger, a fact neither of them can fully understand until later on.

While they give away the ending very early on, the context develops slowly, providing multiple layers of discovery and appreciation over the course of episodes. So, even though I knew the ending from the very start, I cannot say I fully understood or appreciated it until much later, as comments became clear and the reality sank in. The alternating perspectives also served to fill in the gaps, as one character might experience something described by the other at another part. It was enjoyable having the chance to put the pieces together and reconstruct the story as it developed, filling in the missing pieces from both the start and end.

Aside from Directive and Seren, I’m not sure I’ve had as emotional a reaction to an audiodrama as I did with Janus Descending. There is something beautiful and tragic in the unfolding story of these characters. They become so complete in the telling of the story, and something about knowing the end makes it all the more poignant. It is truly a beautiful story set in a very terrifying world.

Of course, the plot centers around exploration of an alien world. And this is handled wonderfully, telling a tense story with excellent pacing, careful reveals, and building unease. The alien concept is not necessarily unheard of, and fans of sci-fi staples will probably recognize familiar ideas. However, the way it develops and is presented sets it apart from other similar works. It takes these familiar threads and weaves them in a different way, using clever moments of obscurity and revelation to savor the exploration of the world they have encountered.

Overall, Janus Descending is a podcast that has stuck with me since I first listened. It is the kind of story I wish I could write, done masterfully. It combines sci-fi and horror elements that are familiar, but through careful work and thoughtful character development, spins those into a new listening experience. It remarkably balances character and plot, developing both in chronological and reverse order simultaneously. The attention to detail in the characters and themes of the story makes it feel cohesive from start to finish, weaving a beautifully tragic tale of space exploration that deserves plenty of listens. If you like sci-fi/horror podcasts, this is pretty much required listening.

You can find them here: Janus Descending and support the No Such Things Productions team through options here

And again, they absolutely deserve all the support you can provide. So please, help them keep creating new shows, like the upcoming sequel to Janus Descending, Descendants.

Terse Tales: The Knock

Theme: Escape


Jessie settled in her chair and let the beach surround her. Deep breath in and she tasted the salty air, slightly fishy, but pleasantly so. She heard gulls circling out at sea, their calls coming in with the steady rhythm of the waves. Her phone buzzed; she ignored it.

The sun was warm, bright. The sand beneath her feet radiated heat up through the soles of her feet, and she dug her toes down to find cooler sand below. The phone was ringing. Another deep breath, sinking into her seat.

She watched the waves come in and out, sea dancing with sunlight, white foam licking at the sand. Another ring, this time an email, and she let the waves carry away the distraction. Her ears settled on the roar of the waves.

Someone was knocking on a door, and she let her eyes drift across the sand. Now there was the sound of kids playing, calling to one another. A steady bubble of human chatter beneath the steady pulse of the waves. She breathed in time to the tides, in and out, with the same steadiness and certainty.

Just a peaceful day on the beach, blue skies, white sands, and–another knock. “Jessie? You in there? I brought the reports you asked for. I can come back later?” No footsteps. Lena was, despite her words to the contrary, waiting.

Jessie’s eyes snapped open, the beach fading from her mind as the office returned. Her peace lay shattered and dispersed in the piles of paper on her desk. She briefly noticed that her hands were digging into the arm of her chair. So much for a break.

She stood and opened the door before Lena could leave. Deep breath in, the subtle scent of salt, as the world reclaimed its space.

A Listener Reviews: Primordial Deep

Primordial Deep

Episodes: 7 episodes + a prologue and epilogue in season 1.

Length: 45 – 75 minutes (and worth every second)

I’ve listened to… all of season 1.

Transcripts Available: Yes, linked here

The Premise: A crew is sent deep under the sea in order to investigate strange happenings. However, it becomes quickly evident that there is more under the water than anyone bargained for, and their employer must know more than he let on.

My Review: No Such Things Productions are the creative geniuses behind Janus Descending which, after realizing I have not already reviewed it, will be reviewed next week in eager anticipation of their new story in the Janus Descending world. But today’s focus is on Primordial Deep, a sci-fi horror show set in the deep oceans of our very own planet. Continuing with the theme of the strange, horrifying, and alien, this earth-bound tale weaves a fantastic and heart wrenching story.

I’m writing this fresh off of the season finale. And woah. Let me tell you, it is a spooky ride, but one that you should definitely join. The cast of characters really makes this work a masterpiece. A story like this with carboard characters who can live or die without any emotion would fall into anonymity with hundreds of similar stories. But the amount of life brought to each character in this story is remarkable. It is a character story told in a horrific setting, with stakes increasing moment by moment.

The classic conflicts are human vs. human, human vs. self, and human vs. nature. Primordial Deep manages to weave all three of these conflicts into one single story, with constantly shifting threats from within and without. The writing balances danger and periods of quiet well, but never lets the listener feel too comfortable. If it is not monsters, it’s the boss or a character’s own thoughts that threaten to destroy the team and mission. The pacing is wonderful in this regard. The show spends time learning about, understanding, and developing characters both during times of distress and times of relative quiet. In turn, the listener develops a strong relationship with them.

There are a lot of heavy hits in this show, and it is not for the faint of heart. The story is unapologetically dense, tackling a lot of difficult themes around life, relationships, grief, guilt, and belonging. However, these are consistent with the overall themes of the story and the developmental needs of the characters. Each person comes in with their strengths, weaknesses, and works in progress. As humans, they are messy, hurting each other in their attempts to keep self and others safe. No one reacts perfectly to every situation, and it provides a level of realism to the otherwise sci-fi setting.

Admittedly, I am one of those people who does not trust the ocean on a good day, and this audiodrama has provided me ample reasons to stay far away in the future. There are creatures in here, and the development and creativity of these is incredible. They provide varying levels of threat, making it often hard to know what is dangerous and what isn’t….until it is. I am not a marine biologist, but the descriptions and explanations presented also felt really consistent throughout. Is it scientifically accurate? I have no idea. Is it convincing and well-developed in a fictional setting? Absolutely.

And the sound. It is very atmospheric, which is really crucial for a story where the setting is as much a character as any of the voice actors. They provide a great background for what is happening and allow the listener to discover some of the secrets of the ocean alongside the characters, based on the well-designed sound cues. I think the investigative tone of the initial mission also functions well in the audiodrama format, as characters provide scientific descriptions of creatures encountered and their behavior. I left most episodes with a great mental picture of what was going on, whether I wanted to imagine such things or not.

Overall, if the preceding paragraphs have not given it away entirely, Primordial Deep is a horrifically good sci-fi story about the dangers under the water. It develops the characters well in order to fully engage the listener, and then holds them there with wonderfully developed sound design and expert writing. Once the story takes off, it does not slow down much, hurtling toward greater stakes and danger each step of the way. It’s worth listening to, and with all of season 1 released, it is definitely worth binging so you can eagerly wait for more.

You can find them here: Primordial Deep and support the No Such Things Productions team through options here

Also, one moment, but this creative group is one that absolutely should be swimming (pun only moderately intended) in Patreon support. So if you can support them, please do, because I need them to be around a long time creating such wonderful shows.

Terse Tales: When Opportunity Calls

Theme: The call came at midnight


The phone was ringing. I reached a hand toward the buzzing, glowing thing and sat up, trying to clear the sleep from my voice. 

“Hello?” It didn’t work, and my words came out with the familiar fuzzy, just-woken quality. 

“Mike? It’s Chris.” Chris. I checked the caller ID on the screen. New guy from work. Nice enough, but not the sort I would take middle of night phone calls from. 

“Uh-huh,” I added to the conversation, dropping all pretense. If you called this late–early–then you knew the person had been sleeping. 

“I figured it out. I was having this dream, and it just all–Boom!” 

“Figured what out?” 

“The time travel project, of course” 

“Time travel?” 

Chris laughed. “Why else do you think I’d be waking you up? We both know what a grump you are.” 

He was clearly drunk. Or high. Probably both, I reasoned. 

“Listen, Chris, I think you need to get back to sleep. We’ve got work tomorrow, and we can talk then.” I figured he would instead be sleeping off whatever this was, but did not say as much. I just wanted to go back to sleep myself. 

“Work? Mike, what are you–” he stopped midsentence. 

“It’s Wednesday morning, bud. Sleep it off.” 

“No, it’s not. We don’t–” 

He paused, there was an intake of breath on the line. Part excitement, part shock. 

“What’s the date, Mike?” 

“Now? It’s February 10.” I said after checking the phone screen. 

“February 10…” he trailed off, waiting for me. 

I sighed and ran a hand across my face. The smart thing to do was hang up. “2021,” I said instead. 

“Oh.” In his voice was surprise, confusion. “Oh,” he said again. This time somber and shocked. “I have to get back,” were his final words before the call disconnected. 

A Listener Reviews: Life with LEO(h)

Life with LEO(h)

Episodes: 3 so far

Length: 25-40 minutes each

I’ve listened to… all available episodes

Transcripts Available: Yes, linked here

The Premise: Life With LEO(h) follows Jeanine, a futuristic lawyer specializing in keeping one rule-bending company out of trouble. After saving them yet again, she is given her very own android. The problem is, LEO(h) has free will, something that is definitely not okay. The story follows Jeanine, caught in this ethical nightmare, and LEO(h), the loving, empathic, optimistic, and only sort of helpful android as they confront questions about free will and love.

My Review: I was contacted to review this audidorama and was so excited. As I mentioned when reviewing them, The Bright Sessions was one of the first audiodramas that got me truly hooked on the genre. So when Atypical Artists reached out about one of their new projects, it was an easy choice.

The story so far has been a blast. Jeanine and LEO(h) are incredibly interesting characters, and the supporting cast really add a great background to provide depth to the world and additional stakes. The writing is sharp and engaging. There is a wonderful pace to every scene that keeps the story moving along, while unraveling strange cases or sifting through personal problems. Each episode is constructed to move the overall story forward, while also handling new challenges.

In one sense, it feels like a really smartly written sitcom. The episodes each have their own individual struggles, and each of these play into the bigger picture. The comedic aspects of it are very much based on the absurdity of certain situations and vicarious awkwardness, and yet that balances very well with the real important questions. Early on, the story introduces the concept of consent. LEO(h) has free will, except in that he must love Jeanine. The show dives straight into the question of whether or not that is free will, and can consent be freely given?

The world feels close to ours, albeit with advanced AI and androids. The situations are realistic extensions of what we experience today, updated to a futuristic setting. As the show has progressed, the intricacies of this reality have been further and further developed. Jeanine’s work colleagues offer insights into the complex system set up to try and manage the world of android law. Through their cases and conversations, the preconceived ideas and assumptions that keep things running begin to show up, and LEO(h) serves as a contrast to the legal precedent.

In addition, Jeanine’s sister and fiancée break up the tension with their good-spirited banter and familial taunting. They offer a space for Jeanine to reflect and get a good reality check as needed, while also rooting for some exciting romantic drama to keep them entertained. They are a wonderful addition and serve to provide a human, lighthearted element to the story overall.

I am truly smitten with Life with LEO(h) so far. The writing is quick, witty, and engaging. The plot is well-paced and intriguing. The characters, both main and secondary, are relatable, energetic, and realistic. I also cannot wait to see where they take some of the big questions around free will, sentience, love, and consent. I am not a huge romance fan, but this is one romcom I am eagerly waiting for, episode after episode. If you like some laughter and humanity in your sci-fi audiodrama, it is definitely one to listen to.

You can find them here: Life with LEO(h) and support the podcast here

Terse Tales: Homesick

This is a new thing. Welcome to my first Terse Tale, chosen as a name almost entirely because of alliteration. I’ll be sharing some micro stories I have been writing for an online challenge over the past few weeks. These are 100-300 word stories based on a given prompt. I’ve always been rather wordy, so I have found it really tough and rewarding to try and tell a convincing story in a short format. Sometimes the attempts is a success, other times less so. But I have found myself thinking a lot more about what I say and how I say it when writing. Ideally, I will post these weekly for as long as I continue to write them!

So, in the interest of brevity, here is the first one, based on the theme “it was as if time itself stopped.”


It was as if time itself stopped. Or perhaps that was just wishful thinking. I wondered how long I could stay there silent, motionless, barely breathing. Perhaps they would just go away and I could imagine nothing was wrong.

They were touching me now, a hand light on my arm. I think it was supposed to be reassuring, yet it only served to threaten my careful shell of denial. And they were talking, but I could not be bothered to tune my mind to their words. I was in freefall and neither gravity nor time could touch me unless I chose to stop.

“We’re not going home?” My words broke through, surprising both of us, and they stumbled mid-sentence. A heartbeat of silence.

“No. The boosters were too damaged to get us off the surface.” They were repeating what they had already said, I realized, but the words felt all new to me, striking a fatal blow each time.

“Rescue?”

“Not with the storms and solar flares picking up. We’re lucky to have landed at all.”

Lucky, they said. Didn’t feel that way. I glanced at the small photo taped haphazardly to my work station. That small face that I knew would age years in the time I was away, but now–

“Food?”

“A few weeks, with rationing. No one could have predicted–” 

“And a few months until rescue,” I interrupted. They didn’t say anything more. They did not need to. I understood perfectly my sentence as I was to serve it. Weeks or months had no meaning; I would float through the remaining time left, but I was already dead. 

I grabbed the picture as I walked away. He and I were now both frozen moments in time, even if mine soon would run out.

A Listener Reviews: Super Villain

Super Villain

Episodes: 7

Length: 20-30 minutes

I’ve listened to… All seven episodes

Transcripts Available: No

The Premise: A comedy series about super heroes and, more directly, the super villains in the world. It is a light-hearted show that tackles superhero tropes head on, using those to develop a different perspective as it follows the daughter of famed super villains and their lasting impact on her life.

My Review: Super Villain is a production of Phonic Phoenix, a group creating comedy sketches, including short and long-form content. This seven part series sits alongside other, brief, standalone comedy sketches. The creator reached out to me and suggested I look at Super Villain specifically, and so this review remains focused on that series. (But if you are looking to subscribe on your app of choice, the feed is Phonic Phoenix.)

Super Villain is an enjoyable listen, a story about the nuanced and more down-to-earth life in a world with heroes and villains. In general, the tone is rather light, even when discussing some significant challenges, and remains optimistic. It is a feel-good kind of tale, but taking a different approach to the hero genre. Episode one ends with a direct, fourth-wall breaking commentary on the superhero genre, specifying the ways Super Villain intends to do something different. It was a cute and clever way to highlight that, despite some familiar opening notes, the story intended to diverge.

The main character is Dani, daughter of a famed super villain duo. She is forced to wrestle with the legacy of her parents, as well as decide who she wants to be in the world while overcoming obstacles she never asked for. In addition, there is Captain Hero, our requisite super do-gooder, and The Sage, his current nemesis. Dani is the best developed of the characters, and I really enjoyed following her story. She has attitude and grit, which makes it interesting to listen. I enjoyed following the ways she got out of challenges, using her strengths and weaknesses to handle the day-to-day struggles of life in superhero world.

The Narrator is also a key character. Super Villain is told within a frame story of an audiodrama production. The Narrator is there to read the script, keep things on track, and advocate on behalf of listeners and characters. There is the traditional script-reading, but also “unscripted” commentary about what is happening. This allows the show to address some concerns, such as the dialogue in episode one explaining why it is not your run-of-the-mill hero show, while also providing some levity and optimism. I do feel that at times the writing leans to heavy on the Narrator to explain things, when instead it may make sense to trust the audience to put it together. However, the Narrator is a likable character and provides some relatable reactions to the unfolding script. In addition, this role provides a lot of the non-audio cues. He sets the scene, describes visuals, and narrates actions that might be confusing in an audio format.

The first two episodes really serve to set the background and introduce the main characters. This is important information for appreciating the story as a whole, but the excitement really takes off in episode three with the characters, conflicts, and world fairly well-established. It is an engaging ride throughout, and I was very drawn into the story within a few episodes. The writing is good, with some clever moments and organic dialogue. Dani’s conversations and interactions with her friends felt fun and supportive, a bright spot of human connection in a story shining a spotlight on the hurt we can cause each other.

The plot and ideas were well-constructed, rarely wasting information. Each moment and scene propels the story along. In some ways, this can feel convenient: the right person always happens to be listening at the right time. But, it also works well for the pacing and structure needed, avoiding traps that could bog down what is a well-paced tale. It simply does not waste time on unnecessary things. Even when I thought something was wrong or superfluous, it turned out it was just hinting at a more important reveal. The general plot is a comedic action-adventure, and yet it manages to bring in big questions about right, wrong, and meaning without breaking stride.

Overall, it was an enjoyable show to listen to that gave a more nuanced view of life in the world with super humans. At its core, it is not about being a hero/villain and saving/destroying the world, but more about figuring out who you want to be. The frame story helps maintain its upbeat, hopeful tone throughout, even when asking big questions and tackling tough moments. The character of Dani is well-developed and fun to get to know, with a selection of side characters that enrich the world and relationships therein. If you are wanting a break from the dark, gritty, nail-biting urgency of modern day superheroes, Super Villain is a enjoyable exploration of these ideas worth a listen.

You can find them here: Super Villain

A Listener Reviews: Arcane

Arcane

Episodes: 7 so far

Length: 10-20 minutes

Transcripts Available: No

I’ve listened to… All currently available episodes

The Premise: An unnamed man discovers a supernatural realm and uses his skills to help and protect others, as well as himself. It follows him interacting with the strange and unknown in all kinds of encounters with the supernatural.

My Review: The show creator reached out to me a few months back to let me know about their upcoming release. As the show was still new, I mentioned it in my 2020 Roundup and agreed to come back when a bit more of the show was available for review. And now at seven episodes, I am excited to point you toward this show!

Arcane is a mysterious supernatural audiodrama following our unnamed protagonist as he encounters all kinds of supernatural oddities. It covers a wide range of different scenarios in the first few episodes, with people trying to steal knowledge/power, spells gone wrong, and people with strange abilities. While having a “monster of the week” style approach, the dangers encountered veer away from the traditional tropes /monsters and focus on more unique experiences.

The first episode starts off with a rather dark turn, setting the stage for the somber tone and high stakes of the series so far. On my first time listening, I was not sure what to take from Episode 1, but it came into focus as the episodes developed. I have found myself going back to episode one and turning over some of the unique plot points from time to time, just because it really caught me by surprise in a fantastic way. I do think this is a show that takes an episode or two to hit its stride, not in the quality of content, but in the overarching concept. Once it settles into that rhythm, the surprises continue to show up, but I felt I was able to appreciate more because I was better oriented to the universe.

The sound is great and serves the story well. It is not overdone, but it provides appropriate context clues for what is happening in the scenes so that a listener can get a good visual of situations. Similarly, the blend between narration and dialogue works well. The unnamed protagonist provides some very helpful context and background as needed through narrative pauses, without turning into too much of a monologue. It can be hard to strike that balance, especially in a story where the world building is very important, and I think it lands with a good split of both overall.

One of the things I most enjoy is the slow discovery in this particular story. There is limited handholding by the creator as to what things mean in the broader context, but there are clues and breadcrumbs to follow regarding the bigger picture. It is a really pleasant experience to notice those pieces coming together and forming the background to the events in each episode. There is definitely a much broader, deeper world here than has been revealed so far, and I have enjoyed the opportunity to piece things together as they come up within the context of the episodes.

Overall, Arcane is a unique take on the brooding, supernatural serial. It has moments of light and darkness woven together to create a complex world that had been exciting to explore. The writing and sound are solid, providing the necessary frame to get drawn into the world being created. It deals with familiar ideas, but avoids falling into classic tropes and traps, instead introducing unique concepts and conflicts in each episode. I am excited to listen to more and see the world of Arcane continue to develop.

You can find them here: Arcane

Back from Hiatus

Hello!

I had to take a brief break to handle some family medical issues. All is well now, and so I plan to get back to regular reviews, plus maybe a few new ideas. I hope to finish up a podcast review for next week, and I have a couple lined up for the next little bit. As always, if you create an audiodrama podcast and would like me to listen, feel free to reach out via the contact form!

A Listener Reviews: Malevolent

Malevolent

Episodes: 8 publicly available. Patreon supporters have access to episodes in a weekly format ahead of public release, with a total of 47 weekly episodes currently available for $5 and up Patrons. 

Length: Monthly cuts are 35-45 minutes in length. Weekly episodes are 5-10 minutes each.

I’ve listened to… All 7 public episodes and maybe (definitely) all the Patreon episodes. I got hooked.

The Premise: Arthur Lester awakens with two startling revelations. He cannot see, and there is another voice inside his head. The story follows him and this entity as they try to understand what has happened, getting drawn deeper and deeper into a web of otherworldly conspiracies that put them both at risk. Using the Chaosium system to provide some additional framework to the story, it takes the listener on a mystery adventure deep through cosmic horror unknowns.

My Review: In the interest of all transparency, this creator reached out to me on Reddit and asked me to review the series. I had been eyeing the episodes for a while, so decided to take a listen. After listening to the 7 monthly cuts of episodes widely available, I decided it was well worth the $5 investment to get access to more, and I have just been listening to as many as possible since.

Malevolent is cosmic horror, and it delves into that genre quickly with rituals, sacrifices, ancient evils, and plenty of bizarre deaths and evocations. If you are familiar with lovecraftian stories, this will feel familiar, but far from stale. The plot twists and turns into danger every step of the way, constantly ratcheting up tension, while using brief moments of pause to summarize and reflect on what needs to happen next. One thing I found very interesting is that each of the weekly episodes ends with a choice that $10 and up Patrons can vote on, determining which path the characters will follow. I think the plot works seamlessly around these plot points, and even with outside control, the writing ensures the decisions are consistent with the world and characters as they are developing. The story also does a great job of providing subtle hints and clues throughout the story so that listeners can begin to piece things together. It is hard to create a sense of the uncanny through audio alone, but Malevolent manages to incorporate by providing just enough details so that the listener begins to realize the pieces aren’t aligning. And then the bizarre shines through, mimicking that real world feeling. 

Arthur is the main character, a private investigator now being forced to solve what may be an impossible mystery for human minds to comprehend. The stakes are high; an entity has moved into his head and, while seemingly an ally, there is no guarantee that the arrangement will last forever or end well for Arthur. He is a sympathetic character, and I find he demonstrates a good level of thoughtfulness in the story, while also having his moments of panic and helplessness. While we might all like to imagine we would escape mostly unscathed, Arthur shows how easily human ingenuity can be eclipsed by the otherworldly.

The Entity, which is the title I will use to avoid any potential spoilers, is just as stuck as Arthur, and yet may know more than they are letting on. That’s a great deal of the character tension, because while they are working together, Arthur and the Entity are in adversarial roles simply due to their situation. As details emerge, they serve to further complicate the tenuous partnership. The Entity also fills in some of the details and provides an excellent narrative voice. Since Arthur cannot see, the Entity explains things as they happen. I think this allows the story to sidestep one of the potential pitfalls in audiodrama in general. The audience is provided a detailed descriptions of characters, scenes, and events. This made me feel like I was getting the chance to play along, wondering if Arthur would take the same thing from encounters or places that I did, following the same leads.

The sound design for episodes is also fantastic. I think the story is served well with a blind main character. Arthur is just as surprised by sudden sounds and noises, and it creates a deeper sense of immersion. Additionally, the spooky noises, background sound effects, and wonderful skill of additional voice actors really serves to create a dynamic and engaging world. (Correction, all the voices are provided by ONE PERSON! Even more impressive, because I had no idea.) It is very easy to get sucked in and walk alongside Arthur through his perilous journey. I found episodes flying by as I listened, caught up in a world I could not see, but could easily experience.

As a brief aside, the story does use the Chaosium system, as stated in materials. I am not an actual-play podcast person, nor have I played an in-depth RPG-style tabletop game (but plenty of other tabletop games). I mention it to say, after reading up a bit on the system and some of the Call of Cthulhu rulebook, I can see how the system helps provide some additional structure to the story. That said, it is not an actual-play podcast and does not use dice rolls. I also never found myself lost or confused because I do not have the RPG experience. My one hesitation prior to listening was the reference to Chaosium and worries that I would be in the dark. Fortunately, I have not found that to be the case in the slightest.

Overall, I am so glad I gave this a listen. It is a great spooky story where the unraveling tale keeps me hooked. I am working to put the pieces together as the story develops, feeling like I am walking alongside Arthur and the Entity as they get pulled in deeper and deeper. The writing is strong, dialogue well written and acted, and sound design on point to create an immersive experience. I have been able to get lost in the world and the mystery of Malevolent, and I think it is an excellent listen if you need a little more otherworldly terror in your life. And who doesn’t, right?

You can find them here: Malevolent and support them on Patreon for access to weekly episodes, plus the opportunity to help determine Arthur’s fate.