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13 Stories of Halloween: I See

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The collection of girls sat gathered around the Ouija board, huddled in tight. Candles flickered from the table top, casting just enough light to pick up the black letters printed on the board. Sherry’s mom had bought the game for them to play with on their annual Halloween slumber party. The nervous giggles died down as Sherry did the honors of asking the first question.

“Is there anybody out there?” she asked, leaving the words hanging there in the silence of the house. Her parents had gone to bed hours ago, and they had even agreed to send her annoying little brother to their grandparents’ house for the night. The triangle on the board stubbornly refused to move.

“I don’t think it’s working,” whispered Janie, doing her best to mask relief with boredom.

“Sh! Be patient,” barked Sherry. “It’s okay, you can talk to us,” she cajoled any listening spirits. “Just say hi!” Still nothing.

Claire piped up, always the voice of optimism. “Maybe they are just shy. It might be better if we introduce ourselves, first.” The remaining three agreed, Sherry eager to find anything that could help jumpstart what was supposed to be the main event.

“I’ll start. My name is Sherry. This is my house,” she smiled, looking around the room toward the ceiling. After no noticeable response, she nodded to her left.

“I’m Janie. That’s it.”

Everyone looked at the third member of the party. “I’m Olivia,” said the third, her voice thin and wavering. “It’s nice to meet you.”

Finally it came full circle. “And I’m Claire! Now you don’t have to be so nervous!”

“Good idea, Claire,” said Sherry with a smile. “Now, is there anybody out there?”

Their expectations rose, only to trickle back down as the silence stretched. No response.

“I’m going to the bathroom,” said Janie, rising and stomping out of the room.

Olivia piped up, uncertainty in her voice as always. “Maybe we could ask something else? Like maybe it’s rude that we keep talking like they aren’t even here?”

“Well what would you ask?” snapped Sherry.

“I don’t know, maybe…” Olivia leaned down, placing her fingers on the planchette. “Would you like to talk to us?”

For a moment, nothing. Then, the little piece of plastic spun toward “Yes.”

There was a moment of silence, then gasps as the reality settled in. “What’s your name?” said Sherry.

The pointer did not move.

“Are you dead?” asked Claire. Sherry gave her a withering look.

“You can’t just ask things like that. It’s rude, Claire.” But the being responded, the marker spiraling towards “No.”

“Are you a demon?” said Sherry quickly, her eyes wide.

“No.”

“Well what are you then?”

A pause, Sherry eyeing the board with equal parts amazement, excitement, and terror. Slowly, this time, the marker moved.

“I-S-E-E.” Then it stopped.

“An isee? Like the slushies?” asked Claire with a short giggle. Sherry scoffed.

“No. I see. It sees or something. What do you see?” Sherry asked the ceiling.

“Y-O-U.”

“This isn’t funny. Are you doing that?” asked Olivia, fixing Sherry with a plaintive look. Sherry shook her head. The planchette moved to yes.

“How many people are in this room?” asked Claire, caught up in the moment.

“4.” The three girls quickly counted one another and arrived at the same conclusion. There were three of them sitting around the board.

“Why are you here?” asked Sherry. There was no response.

Janie’s return startled all three of them, and they fell back with shrieks that devolved into giggles.

“Janie, we’ve got something!” Sherry nearly shouted when she had calmed down enough. Janie looked skeptical.

“Really? What’s their name?”

“They wouldn’t tell us,” said Olivia, looking somewhat embarrassed and frightened at the missing information.

“Well, what is it then?” snapped Janie, obviously under the impression she was about to be the butt of some half-conceived practical joke.

The events of the night likely could have been attributed to sugar, a slight tendency towards deception, and superstition. Until that question. Because with that, the Ouija board responded on its own, no hands or sneaky fingers nearby to push the piece along the board.

“I-S-E-E,” it spelled again. Eight eyes watched it fearfully.

“What do you see?” asked Janie, her voice just above a whisper.

“We already—“ began Claire, but then piece was moving again.

“Y-O-U,” it reiterated, and everyone could feel the exasperation whatever it was had at repeating itself.

“What do you mean, you see us?” asked Janie with scared bravado.

“Y-O-U,” it said, moving faster. “Y-O-U-Y-O-U-Y-O-U-Y-O—“ Olivia snatched the thin piece of plastic off the board.

“I don’t think we should play with this anymore,” she said, hugging the pointer to her chest as her eyes stared down at the cheap board.

“Come on, Liv. It’s just getting good,” Sherry said. “Don’t be a baby and ruin it for the rest of us.”

Olivia looked at them, then tossed the marker to the floor before standing herself. “I’m going to bed, then. You guys can play with the devil all you want.”

“No,” said the board, but Olivia was already out of the room.

The remaining three circled around, leaning in close to watch every possible move.

“Are you a spirit?”

“No.”

“Are you evil?”

“No.”

“So you’re good, then.” Janie wasn’t asking, but the board answered.

“No.”

“Maybe Liv’s right,” said Claire, her usual optimism dissipating as reality sunk in. Games weren’t supposed to play themselves. “I’m going to go to bed, too. I’m not having fun anymore.”

The door closed behind her, and Sherry leaned over the board with feverish excitement. “Can you see our futures?”

“Yes.”

“Who am I going to marry?” began Sherry. She quickly crossed her fingers and began mouthing the name Tony Anderson, her crush since the third grade.

“No.”

“That’s not an answer. You have to answer my questions.”

“Let me try,” interjected Janie. “Who will I marry?”

“D-A-V-E,” it said with some finality.

The two girls looked puzzled, turning the name over. Neither knew of a Dave. There was David Smith two years ahead of them, but he never went by Dave.

“A mystery man, eh?” joked Sherry.

“I guess so. Let’s try another one. Will I be famous?” asked Janie, a smirk on her lips.

“No.”

“What about me?” interjected Sherry, already preening.

“Yes.”

“A singer?”

“No.”

“A musician?”

“No.”

“An artist? An actor? A politician? A scientist? A—“ Sherry ran out of desired careers as the marker repeatedly bounced over the word “no.”

“Well then what?” she finally asked, exasperated.

“D-E-A-D.”

There was a finality to the movement. Sherry turned white, her eyes seeming to take up half of her face with shock. “Dead,” she whispered, the word barely audible over the hum of the air conditioning unit.

“Yes,” the board dutifully replied.

“I don’t think I like this anymore, Janie,” Sherry said as she backed away. “I think this was a very bad idea.” Without taking her eyes from the board, Sherry turned the doorknob and exited the room, turning and running once she was out in the hall. Janie could hear her footsteps as the pounded down the stairs to the living room where Olivia, Claire, and safety were certainly waiting.

Janie eyed the board curiously, a smile barely visible on her lips. “So,” she began, “if she’s famous and I’m not, I guess that means they never catch me, right?”

“Yes.”


Creative Commons License
This work by Katherine C is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

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